#5370--SCRAM PRAM
by Weston Farmer
Designed as a utility speeder, this simple craft will prove thrilling to handle when powered by motors of not over ten horsepower. She will make an out-and-out racer with the addition of a small steering bridge. She is an ideal boat for the novice to build.
Scram pram is not the latest mechanized plywood version of a Chinese junk, though her name smacks that way. “Scram” is Old English, meaning “to scuttle.” “Pram” is also English—the term for a sawed-off punt. Therefore Scram Pram is really a scuttle punt. Her form is hundreds of years old. Why bother, then, you ask, to publish something that is essentially ancient? Hah! There’s something new on the marine scene that brings the old British pram into her own: Plywood and light outboards with real wallop. This combination of low-pounds-per-horsepower likes to plane. Now plywood comes to you as a plane surface. The trick of screwing these plane surfaces to a form, deflecting them to curved surfaces as little as possible, requires a simple form and frame. This is where the pram form steps up and says, “I’m it!'
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